surfer(s) surfin' The Life of an Ocean Activist (The Florida Keys Reef - U.S. Marine Protected...)
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Hello! My name is Megan, an 18-year-old ocean activist living in Miami, Florida. Going to a school across the street from an amazing view of the ocean, I have found myself ever-so enthralled in its seemingly infinite beauty. I've also realized the desperate state the ocean is in from society's poor choices--things like over-fishing, illegal whaling, and, you guessed it, pollution.

Most people these days are concerned with "going green" and are determined to make their lives more eco-friendly. What many fail to realize is that while being green is admirable, something far larger is at stake from mankind's poor choices than the soil on which we walk, and that is the ocean. Perhaps we should all change our way of thinking and try on an outfit of a different color--blue.

After all; if the oceans die, we die.

The Florida Keys Reef - U.S. Marine Protected Area
The islands in the Florida Keys span 126 miles (200 kilometers) and are home to the most extensive living coral reef in the United States, and the third largest on Earth.
Just south of the Florida peninsula, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary covers 3,708 square miles (9,600 square kilometers).
The region receives more than 4 million visitors a year who come to dive, explore coral reefs and shipwrecks, and fish.
Beyond tourism, the Keys support a nearly 20-million-pound (9-million-kilogram) harvest of seafood and marine products annually. In an effort to protect the ecological and commercial resources in the park, the area was designated a national sanctuary in 1990.
(Photograph by Emory Kristoff)

The Florida Keys Reef - U.S. Marine Protected Area

The islands in the Florida Keys span 126 miles (200 kilometers) and are home to the most extensive living coral reef in the United States, and the third largest on Earth.

Just south of the Florida peninsula, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary covers 3,708 square miles (9,600 square kilometers).

The region receives more than 4 million visitors a year who come to dive, explore coral reefs and shipwrecks, and fish.

Beyond tourism, the Keys support a nearly 20-million-pound (9-million-kilogram) harvest of seafood and marine products annually. In an effort to protect the ecological and commercial resources in the park, the area was designated a national sanctuary in 1990.

(Photograph by Emory Kristoff)

— 2 years ago with 178 notes
#florida keys reef  #florida keys  #florida  #coral reef  #coral reefs  #coral  #reef  #reefs  #protected  #united states  #florida keys national marine sanctuary  #marine sanctuary  #marine  #sanctuary  #ocean life  #ocean  #wildlife  #sea  #conserve  #conservation  #shipwreck  #ship  #wrecks  #peninsula  #seafood  #tourism  #ecotourism 
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